Sell out sale for Jackie Collins auction

Jackie Collins portraitEvery item was sold at Bonhams‘ recent two-day Jackie Collins sale at its Los Angeles saleroom. The total achieved for the 674-lot sale was $3,387,613 (£2,600,056), with $1,264,863 (£970,805) for the first day auction of fine art, furniture and antiques; while the jewellery sale on the second day made a sparkling $2,122,750 (£1,629,250).

The sale gave Collins’ admirers the world over the opportunity to own the jewellery and art that Jackie kept in her beloved Beverly Hills home. As Bonhams Vice-President Leslie Wright said, “Jackie Collins and her books are loved by millions of readers world-wide. This sale was their chance to own a piece of the magic – and they took it. Bids came from all around the globe.”

Tracy, Tiffany and Rory, the three daughters of Jackie Collins, commented, “Our mother would have been delighted that her much-cherished collections of art, antiques and jewellery have found new homes and that her legacy lives on all around the world. She was passionate about collecting, and spent many decades selecting paintings, statuettes and jewellery which brought her joy and creative inspiration. Bonhams had a wonderful vision for the sale – Jackie Collins: A Life in Chapters – which put her collection in the context of her life. Working with Bonhams has been a pleasure and the sale exceeded our expectations. We are thrilled that a portion of all proceeds will be donated to three organizations supporting the empowerment of women, a message very close to our mother’s heart: Malala Fund, Equality Now and WriteGirl.”

Fine Art, Antiques, Furniture from Jackie Collins Collection

Jackie was a serious collector of fine art and sculpture with a particular passion for Art Deco sculpture and 20th century American and British painting.

Jackie Collins Beverly-Hills-interiorHighlights from the two-day auction included:
· Bronzes by Josef Lorenzl, the top lot of this collection was Scarf Dancer, c1925, that made $21,250 (£16,309)
· Several works by the much-loved English painter, Beryl Cook, including Tango in Bar Sur that achieved $27,500 (£21,106)
· Jackie’s bespoke special edition 2002 Jaguar XKR Sportscar, fittingly finished in metallic gold, made $43,750 (£33,578)

Jewellery from the Jackie Collins Collection

The top lot of the sale, a 6.04-carat diamond solitaire ring made $187,500 (£143,909); while a Patek Philippe Platinum and Diamond Wristwatch achieved $31,250 (£23,984)

Matthew Girling, Bonhams Global CEO and Global Head of Jewelry, was one of the auctioneers for the sale during which he managed to namecheck every one of Collins’s novel titles, to the delight of the packed room. As Girling commented, “Like her home, her personality and her characters, Jackie’s jewellery collection featured bold, strong and colourful pieces, many of which were described in loving detail in her books. Given the volume of bids – online, on the phone and in the room – her fans were determined to acquire a piece of the Collins’ legend.”

· Top lot of the sale, a diamond and platinum ring weighing 6.04 carats, D color, VS2 clarity made $187,500 (£143,909)
· An Art Deco diamond, emerald, stone and platinum necklace achieved $56,250 (£43,172)
· Signed pieces by Cartier and Nardi were snapped up by international buyers
· Patek Philippe platinum and diamond wristwatch made $31,250 (£23,984)

A room from Jackie Collins homeThe British-born star published her first novel, The World is Full of Married Men, in 1968, marking the start of a 47-year writing career. An instant success, the book was a bestseller, as were the next 31 novels which together sold more than 500 million copies in 40 countries worldwide.

The fictional world of Hollywood glamor that fans so loved in her works was a reflection of Jackie’s private life in the Hockney-inspired home in Beverly Hills that she designed with her husband, Oscar Lerman, and which was decorated with the sculpture and fine art that featured in Bonhams’ sale, A Life in Chapters.

The two-day sale took place on May 16 and 17.

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